MAIN ARTICLE

Impulsive behavior: What happens in the brain?

What makes us impulsive? Why do we find it so easy to say "yes," when we know that "no" would be better for us in the long run? A recent study i

MORE

New therapeutic approach may improve outcomes in sepsis and stroke

Researchers have tested a new therapeutic method in mouse models of sepsis and stroke. They conclude that it could significantly improve outcomes in both conditions. Many conditions a

MORE

by Bindhu

Research has already shown that running is an activity that can help us stay healthy for longer, but how much do we have to run to extend our lifespan? A new review suggests that no matter how little or how much we run, the exercise is linked with a significantly lower risk of death from all causes. Many studies have shown that running is a healthful form of aerobic exercise that has numerous benefits for both the body and the mind. For example, the authors of a 2018 study argued that running could help protect brain health, while older research has tied this form of physical activity to slower aging. But what link is there, if any, between running and mortality from all causes, and how does this activity affect the risk of death due to cardiovascular disease and cancer, in particular? Furthermore, if running can indeed lead to a longer lifespan, does that mean that more running offers an increased level of protection? These are the questions that researchers from Victoria University in Melbourne, the University of Sydney, and other academic institutions in Australia and elsewhere have recently aimed to answer. To this purpose, the investigators reviewed the relevant literature — including published papers, conference papers, and doctoral theses — looking at the potential links between running and death risk. Their findings appear in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. The researchers caution that their investigation was observational and did not aim to establish cause. Moreover, they note that the studies that they looked at all varied in their methodology and cohort size, which may have affected the final results. Yet they remain confident that, generally speaking, running seems to help health, so they suggest that people consider taking it up. The authors conclude: "Increased rates of participation in running, regardless of its dose, would probably lead to substantial improvements in population health and longevity." (Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

Impulsive behavior: What happens in the brain?

by Bindhu

What makes us impulsive? Why do we find it so easy to say "yes," when we know that "no" would be better for us in the long run? A recent study in rodents explores the neural mechanisms behind impulsivity. Controlling our impulses can often be difficult, but for some of us, the struggle can be all-consuming. Impulsivity is an integral part of a range of conditions, including drug addiction, obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Parkinson's diseaseTrusted Source. The authors of a recent paper, published in Nature CommunicationsTrusted Source, define impulsivity as "responding without apparent forethought for the consequences of one's actions." As they explain, being impulsive is not always a bad thing, but, "It can often lead to consequences that are undesired or unintended." The new study sets out to understand more about the mechanisms that produce impulsivity. The scientists hope that this knowledge might, eventually, lead to interventions that could reduce impulsivity. The study also has certain limitations. First and foremost, the scientists investigated impulsivity using specific food based tests in a rodent model. How this would translate to humans as they navigate real-life choices is difficult to say. Because impulsivity appears in a range of conditions, researchers are sure to continue investigating the science that drives it. (Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

New therapeutic approach may improve outcomes in sepsis and stroke

by Bindhu

Researchers have tested a new therapeutic method in mouse models of sepsis and stroke. They conclude that it could significantly improve outcomes in both conditions. Many conditions and adverse health events can cause chronic inflammation. This is the body's prolonged response to injury. Inflammation is meant to help the body heal. However, in some conditions, it can actually cause further damage — for example, if it lasts for too long, if the response is too strong, or if it is misdirected. This can happen following two potentially life threatening health events: sepsis and stroke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as 795,000 peopleTrusted Source in the United States experience a stroke per year. After such a cerebrovascular event, inflammatory responses typically take place in the brain, as the organ aims to repair its damaged cells. However, poststroke inflammation can also lead to further damage. For this reason, researchers have been looking into ways of arresting or moderating the inflammatory response in order to improve the effectiveness of therapy. Now, a new study in mouse models from Washington State University in Pullman suggests a novel method of preventing damaging inflammatory responses following sepsis or stroke. In a study paper that now appears in the journal Science Advances, the researchers argue that by using innovative technology, it would be possible to deliver a potent drug straight to the cells responsible for causing harmful inflammation. (Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

Why does food with the same nutritional content affect the gut differently?

by Bindhu


Human gut microbiome is a compilation of many different bacteria, which has ignited the curiosity in researchers. Studies were conducted to see how they reacted to different food types. 34 participants were examined for 17 days to check how their gut bacteria reacted to different foods on an everyday basis. The results showed that even the foods which contained similar nutritional profile instilled different reactions in microbiomes. This result is a proof that gut microbiomes can be studied only through a much expansive research. "We had to scratch our heads and come up with a new approach for measuring and comparing the different foods,", says senior author Dan Knights. Researchers say that doing more researches on gut microbiome can help focus on an overall positive shift of a person’s health. “This study suggests that it's more complicated than just looking at dietary components like fiber and sugar. Much more research is needed before we can understand how the full range of nutrients in food affects how the microbiome responds to what we eat." says Dan Knights. (Source: www.medicalnewstoday.com)


Heart health: E-cigarettes just as, if not more, harmful than traditional cigarettes

by Bindhu

Are e-cigarettes less harmful than conventional cigarettes that contain tobacco? From a cardiovascular point of view, at least, new research answers with a resounding "no." In fact, says one study author, "e-cigs may confer as much and potentially even more harm to users" than traditional cigarettes. Despite popular perception, e-cigarettes may not be a safer alternative to tobacco. In light of the recent lung injury outbreak that some researchers have linked to vaping products and electronic cigarettes, two new studies presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2019 in Philadelphia, PA, further highlight the potentially hazardous effects of e-cigarettes on health. The two new studies examine the effect of e-cigarettes on cardiovascular health, more specifically. In this respect, there appears to be insufficient evidence to draw a firm conclusion. However, the two new studies emphasize the possibility that e-cigarettes are just as, if not more harmful than regular cigarettes. Dr. Sana Majid, a postdoctoral fellow in vascular biology at the Boston University School of Medicine in Massachusetts, is the lead author of the first study, which looked at cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose levels in cigarette smokers. Dr. Florian Rader, M.S., medical director of the Human Physiology Laboratory and assistant director of the Non-Invasive Laboratory at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, CA, led the second study, which looked at heart blood flow. (Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

Scientists propose new theory of Parkinson's disease

by Bindhu

As scientists delve deeper into the nature of Parkinson's, the more it appears that it is highly varied, suggesting numerous subtypes. A new review proposes that Parkinson's falls into one of two main categories, depending on whether it originates in the central nervous system (CNS) or the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In a recent Journal of Parkinson's Disease paper, scientists from Denmark argue how results from imaging and tissue studies fit with a theory of Parkinson's that divides the condition "into a PNS-first and a CNS-first subtype." Parkinson's disease principally destroys dopamine cells in the brain's substantia nigra area. This is the part that controls movement. This damage gives rise to the most common symptoms, including tremors, rigidity, and balance difficulties. Parkinson's disease may also cause emotional changes, depression, constipation, sleep disruption, and urinary problems. The pattern of symptoms and their rate of progression can vary widely among individuals. A distinguishing feature of Parkinson's, however, is the accumulation and spread of toxic clumps of alpha-synuclein protein called Lewy bodies. These clumps are also hallmarks of dementia with Lewy bodies. (Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)


Supergreen soup with yogurt & pine nuts

by Sophie Godwin

2 tsp olive oil
1 onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 potato(approx 250g), cut into small cubes
600ml vegetable stock
120g bag mixed watercress, rocket and
spinach salad
150g pot natural yogurt
20g pine nuts, toasted
chilli oil, to serve (optional)

  1. Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over a low-medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, then cook slowly, stirring occasionally, for 10 mins until softened but not coloured. Add the garlic and cook for 1 min more.

  2. Tip in the potato followed by the veg stock. Simmer for 10-12 mins until the potato is soft enough that a cutlery knife will slide in easily. Add the bag of salad and let it wilt for 1 min, then blitz the soup in a blender until it’s completely smooth.

  3. Serve with a dollop of yogurt, some toasted pine nuts and a drizzle of chilli oil, if you like.

FEATURED VIDEO

Medi BizTV © Copyright 2020, All Rights Reserved Design and development by: Aries e-Solutions