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What to know about an onion allergy

When a person is allergic to onions, their immune system reacts as if the onions are a dangerous substance. The result is allergic symptoms that can be severe, such as vomiting, it

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Iron-rich foods may cancel out tomatoes anticancer benefits

New research finds that iron halves the absorption of lycopene. Lycopene is a carotenoid full of antioxidants that is present in tomatoes. Regarding cancer, previous studies have foun

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by Neha

According to a recent study, people who regularly consume chili peppers have a reduced mortality risk compared with those who never eat chillies. Chili peppers are now a global phenomenon. From Cambodia to California, and from Birmingham, Alabama to Birmingham, United Kingdom, spicy food is ubiquitous. Throughout history, cultures have associated various health benefits with eating chili peppers. However, as one of the authors of the recent study, Prof. Licia Iacoviello, explains, many of these beneficial properties have been ascribed mostly on the basis of anecdotes or traditions, if not magic. In more recent times, scientists have focused on capsaicin, the compound that gives chili their unmistakable punch. According to the authors of the latest study, capsaicin "has been observed to favorably improve cardiovascular function and metabolic regulation in experimental and population studies.Other researchers have concluded that capsaicin might be useful in the fight against neuropathic pain, arthritis, gastrointestinal disorders, and even cancer. In this> study, the top category of chili consumption included those who ate hot chillies four or more times each week. In follow up work, it would be interesting to see if the effect differed in individuals who ate chillies once or twice each day. Overall, the authors conclude that "regular consumption of chili peppers is associated with [a] lower risk of total and [cardiovascular disease] mortality. The evidence that chillies might benefit health is mounting; the next step will be to understand how. (Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

What to know about an onion allergy

by Bindhu

When a person is allergic to onions, their immune system reacts as if the onions are a dangerous substance. The result is allergic symptoms that can be severe, such as vomiting, itching, swelling, and difficulty breathing. As onions are a commonly used ingredient in food, they can be difficult to avoid, so it is important for people to be aware if they are allergic. Onions are part of the allium family, a plant group that includes onions, garlic, leeks, scallions, chives, and shallots. This article will explore the symptoms that nutritionists associate with an onion allergy, as well as how to diagnose and treat it. If a person is allergic to onions, symptoms can appear up to 2 hours after ingestion.

Iron-rich foods may cancel out tomatoes anticancer benefits

by Bindhu

New research finds that iron halves the absorption of lycopene. Lycopene is a carotenoid full of antioxidants that is present in tomatoes. Regarding cancer, previous studies have found a link between lycopene — which is a plant compound present in tomatoes — and a lower risk of prostate cancer, colon cancer, and lung cancer, among others. Although consuming lycopene-rich foods is good for health, other nutrients that we combine them with may help or hinder their cancer fighting properties. A small new study now suggests that consuming foods or supplements rich in iron may halve the benefits of lycopene. "When people had iron with their meal, we saw almost a twofold drop in lycopene uptake over time," explains Kopec. "This could have potential implications every time a person is consuming something rich in lycopene and iron — say a Bolognese sauce, or an iron fortified cereal with aside of tomato juice. You're probably only getting half as much lycopene from this as you would without the iron." Says Rachel Kopec. The study authors note that using only male participants in their tests, as well as focusing exclusively on apo‐lycopenoids, limits the study findings.
(CREDITS: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

High protein foods may put heart health at risk

by Neha


According to a new study analyzing the data of thousands of people, an excessive intake of a certain kind of amino acid — present in protein-rich foods — is associated with a higher cardiometabolic risk. Many people follow diets that are high in protein, which can help with weight loss and building muscle mass. However, increasingly, researchers are starting to question whether protein-rich foods provide enough benefits to offset the potential risks. The team’s final analysis, which accounted for body weight measurements, revealed that the participants had an average intake of sulfur amino acids that was almost 2.5 times higher than the estimated average requirement of 15 milligrams per kilogram of body weight per day. “Many people in the U.S. consume a diet rich in meat and dairy products, and the estimated average requirement is only expected to meet the needs of half of healthy individuals,” points out study co-author Xiang Gao.Therefore, it is not surprising that many are surpassing the average requirement when considering these foods contain higher amounts of sulfur amino acids,” says Gao. Moreover, the investigators found that participants with higher sulfur amino acid intakes also tended to have higher composite cardiometabolic risk scores. This association remained in place even after the researchers accounted for confounding factors, including age, biological sex, and a history of health conditions such as hypertension and diabetes. As for the source of the sulfur amino acids, the team said that they were present in almost all foods, excluding grains, fruit, and vegetables. “Meats and other high protein foods are generally higher in sulfur amino acid content,” notes lead author Zhen Dong, Ph.D. “People who eat lots of plant-based products like fruits and vegetables will consume lower amounts of sulfur amino acids. These results support some of the beneficial health effects observed in those who eat vegan or other plant-based diets,” Dong adds. The researchers caution that the current findings are, so far, only observational, pointing to an association rather than verifying causality. “A longitudinal study would allow us to analyze whether people who eat a certain way do end up developing the diseases these biomarkers indicate a risk for,notes Prof. Richie. Nevertheless, he stresses that the recent study shows that researchers should pay more attention to the possible risks associated with dietary amino acids.


Is marijuana use associated with a higher risk of cancer?

by Bindhu

As the use of marijuana is increasing in the United States, researchers are asking whether the use of this substance — particularly smoking joints — is associated with an increased risk of any form of cancer, and, if so, which. Marijuana is one of the most widely used drugs in the United States, with more than one in seven adults reporting that they used marijuana in 2017. Statistical reports project that sales of cannabis for recreational purposes in the U.S. will amount to $11,670 million between 2014 and 2020. According to recent research, smoking a joint remains one of the main ways in which individuals use marijuana recreationally. While specialists already know that smoking tobacco cigarettes is a top risk factor for many forms of cancer, it remains unclear whether smoking marijuana can increase cancer risk in a similar way. To try to find out whether there is a link between recreational marijuana use and cancer, researchers from the Northern California Institute of Research and Education in San Francisco and other collaborating institutions recently conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing this potential association. "Marijuana smoke and tobacco smoke share carcinogens, including toxic gases, reactive oxygen species, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzo[alpha]pyrene and phenols, which are 20 times higher in unfiltered marijuana than in cigarette smoke," write first author Dr. Mehrnaz Ghasemiesfe and colleagues. "Given that cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and smoking remains the largest preventable cause of cancer death (responsible for 28.6% of all cancer deaths in 2014), similar toxic effects of marijuana smoke and tobacco smoke may have important health implications," they go on to emphasize. Going forward, the team suggests that there is an urgent need for better quality studies assessing the potential relationship between marijuana and cancer. The researchers conclude: "Misinformation [on this topic] may constitute an additional threat to public health; cannabis is being increasingly marketed as a potential cure for cancer in the absence of evidence, with enormous engagement in this misinformation on social media, particularly in states that have legalized recreational use."

Role of gut bacteria in spreading breast cancer

by Neha

With about 154,794 women living with metastatic cancer in the U.S, the approach to breast cancer has improved drastically. Still, scientists are dealing with the issue of preventing the spread of cancer to other body parts, which is also knows as metastasis. There are many reasons leading to the spread of cancer. Recently through a study on mice, scientists have discovered the fact that by disrupting the gut microbe, aggressive spread of breast cancer can be initiated. "When we disrupted the microbiome's equilibrium in mice by chronically treating them [with] antibiotics, it resulted in inflammation systemically and within the mammary tissue," says Melanie Rutkowski, Ph.D., of the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. However, she stresses on not to generalise the impacts from mice to humans, and that this does not mean all antibiotics are harmful. Researchers advice to follow a healthy diet to maintain a healthy microbiome. Diet rich in fibre coupled with exercise and adequate sleep are recommended. "If you do all of those things, in theory, you should have a healthy microbiome. And that, we think, is very much associated with a favourable outcome in the long term for breast cancer”, says Melanie Rutkowski


Aviyal

by Rajalekshmy K R

1 cup cucumber
1/2 cup pumpkin
3 cup water
1/2 teaspoon red chilli powder
4 green chilli
1/2 cup beaten yoghurt (curd)
salt as required
1 cup carrot
1/2 cup green unripe bananas
1/2 teaspoon powdered turmeric
1 cup coconut
2 pinches cumin seeds
2 teaspoon coconut oil
10 curry leaves

Step 1

Aviyal recipe is a healthy mix of vegetables cooked to perfection with some mild spices. To prepare this easy vegetable recipe, take a grinding jar and add red pepper powder, coconut and green chillies. Also add cumin seeds and 4-5 tbsp water. Grind together till it becomes a smooth paste, add more water if it’s too thick.

Step 2

To make the veggies adulterant-free, soak them in vessel with lukewarm water with a small pinch of turmeric and salt for 30 minutes. Then, wash the unpeeled vegetables in running water and cut them into thin slices in a large bowl. Now take a shallow pan and heat it on a medium flame.

Step 3

Pour remaining water in pan and heat till water boils. Then add sliced vegetables in water and add turmeric powder. Sprinkle some salt and mix the ingredients well. Once, the vegetables are tender and nicely cooked, add the previously made paste and mix it well with vegetables. Cover the pan with a lid.

Step 4

Cook for another minute, till the vegetables completely absorb the coconut paste. Then add yogurt and toss the vegetables well. Cook for another minute to incorporate the ingredients well. Garnish with coconut oil and curry leaves. Serve immediately.

 

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