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Swollen knee

Swelling is a sign of inflammation. It is a buildup of fluid around a damaged area, and it usually causes the area to become larger and puffier. Inflammation, and therefore swellin

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Yeast diaper rash

There are many possible causes of a diaper rash. A yeast infection occurs when there is an overgrowth of Candida, a type of fungus commonly found in the digestive tract. A yeast infec

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by Neha

The Thrive Patch is a transdermal patch, or plaster, that allegedly helps weight loss by releasing active ingredients into the skin. Proponents recommend it as part of an 8-week weight management course. The Thrive Patch is part of an 8-week weight management and lifestyle experience. Although it contains a few ingredients that scientific research has shown can help weight loss, there is a lack of research looking at the benefits of the patch itself. There are some potential risks of using a Thrive Patch. These include weight gain after use and, possibly, anxiety. More research is necessary to examine the potential long-term risks. It may be worth approaching the Thrive Patch with a bit of skepticism. If someone is looking to lose weight, they may wish to consider increasing their physical activity levels and decreasing their daily calorie intake instead. If a person is looking for alternative ways to lose weight, there are several safe, proven methods. These include:
* increasing physical activity
* decreasing calorie intake
* eating consistent amounts at similar times each day
* eating breakfast
* following certain diets, such as the Mediterranean diet

These techniques may be easier to incorporate into a consistent healthful lifestyle that allows people to maintain a moderate weight.
(credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

Swollen knee

by Bindhu

Swelling is a sign of inflammation. It is a buildup of fluid around a damaged area, and it usually causes the area to become larger and puffier. Inflammation, and therefore swelling, can be acute or chronic. Acute swelling may result from an injury and disappear within a day. Chronic swelling can last much longer and signal an underlying medical condition. Knee swelling may result from an underlying health issue, such as arthritis or an infection, or it may follow an injury. Several home care strategies can reduce the swelling, such as taking NSAIDs and using an ice pack. However, if a person suspects that the swelling results from an underlying condition, it is important to receive professional care. A doctor can assess the damage with imaging and provide treatments, such as antibiotics. Consult a doctor if knee pain does not improve with rest or occurs with other symptoms. Also, see a doctor after a sudden injury, such as from blunt force trauma. In addition, it is important to receive professional care if there are any indications of an infection, such as a fever or pus coming from a wound.
(Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

Yeast diaper rash

by Neha

There are many possible causes of a diaper rash. A yeast infection occurs when there is an overgrowth of Candida, a type of fungus commonly found in the digestive tract. A yeast infection may develop if a person does not take steps to treat a contact dermatitis rash within a few days. It is also common following a round of antibiotics. Receiving treatment for a contact dermatitis rash early on can help prevent a yeast infection from developing. If yeast is causing a diaper rash, the doctor will likely prescribe or recommend an antifungal cream. It is important to follow the instructions about how and when to apply the cream. The doctor may also recommend keeping the area clean and dry, and that the infant or adult should spend some time each day diaper-free. In some cases, over-the-counter antifungal creams treat these infections. If a diaper rash seems infected or has lasted longer than a few days, speak with a doctor. If a yeast infection is responsible for the rash, a doctor will likely prescribe or recommend antifungal cream and advise about additional steps to help the area heal and prevent the rash from returning. (Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

Alcohol and dementia risk: A complex relationship

by Neha


Although alcohol has been popular for millennia, and dementia is increasingly prevalent, scientists are yet to understand the relationship between the two. A recent study sets out for answers. With dementia predicted to affect 13.9 million adults in the United States by 2060, understanding why these conditions develop is more urgent than ever. Scientists have uncovered certain factors that increase the risk of developing dementia. Some, such as advancing age, cannot be prevented. However, it is possible to avoid other potential risk factors, such as smoking tobacco. It is essential to identify modifiable risk factors as understanding these could help prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Recently, researchers designed a study to look for links between dementia and alcohol consumption in older adults. They published their findings in JAMA Network Open. In conclusion, the current study provides few solid answers. It confirms, however, that the relationship between alcohol and dementia is complex and likely to require a great deal more research.(Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)


Link found between chronic headache and back pain

by Neha

A review of 14 studies found that people with persistent headache or back pain were twice as likely to experience the other disorder as well. Chronic headaches and persistent back pain are both debilitating conditions. New findings suggest a link between the two, potentially charting a new course for more effective treatment. Chronic headaches and back pain both appear in the top five causes of years lived with disability. Healthcare professionals often treat the conditions separately, but there is a theory that in some people, they appear together. Therefore, treating both as one disorder may provide better results. Up to 4% of individuals in the global adult population have headaches on 15 or more days of every month, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Meanwhile, about 80% of adults experience low back pain at least once in their lifetime, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and approximately 20% of these people go on to develop chronic low back pain. In 2013, a German study found a link between low back pain and both chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headaches. Now, researchers from the University of Warwick, United Kingdom, appear to have found an even stronger association.(Credits: www.medicalnewstoday.com)

AFib diet

by Neha

AFib is a type of arrhythmia that affects the upper chambers of the heart. The electrical impulses that control these chambers fire in a disorganized way, which leads to an irregular heartbeat. AFib itself is not a life threatening condition. However, it can increase the risk of stroke, blood clots, and congestive heart failure. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that people who experience AFib consume foods low in saturated fats, trans fats, salt, and cholesterol. A 2017 review found that a plant-based diet high in fruit, vegetables, and whole grains can decrease obesity and hypertension. As these are risk factors for AFib, such dietary measures may help prevent someone from developing the condition. There is also evidence to suggest that the Mediterranean diet may help reduce the risk of AFib. A 2014 study suggests that olive oil, in particular, is a beneficial part of the diet. Diet can help reduce the risk factors that cause AFib and, in some cases, reduce its symptoms. The Mediterranean diet or a plant-based diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables, and unsaturated fats may benefit overall heart health, lower cholesterol, and reduce the risk of a heart attack. Other changes that may improve AFib include doing moderate exercise several times per week, getting high quality sleep, stopping smoking, and prioritizing time to relax and reduce stress.


Proper turkey gravy

by Nikey Nath

2 chopped onions

1 large carrot

, chopped
turkey

neck (optional)
1.3l turkey or chicken stock
3 tbsp plain flour
5 tbsp white wine or water

Put the onions and carrot in a large pan with the turkey neck (optional). Pour in stock and simmer for 1 hr. Strain to remove the vegetables and turkey, then return the liquid to the pan. (For a textured gravy, remove the turkey and, using a stick blender, blitz carrot and onion into the stock until very smooth.)

Blend the flour with the white wine or water, then blend this into the stock, stirring over the heat until thickened. Cool, then chill. Will keep for several days or freeze for 1 month. Thaw in the fridge a day ahead. Heat in a pan until piping hot, then add the juices from the turkey and season to taste.

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